• Home
  • Celebrities
  • John Lennon's Killer Confesses and Apologizes To Yoko Ono

John Lennon's Killer Confesses, Issues Apology To Yoko Ono

John Lennon's Killer Confesses, Issues Apology To Yoko Ono
September 23, 2020 - 17:42 / Lucas Anderson

John Lennon's killer, Mark David Chapman, has spoken on why he killed the English musician nearly four decades ago. In addition, he assured that he regrets the crime, while apologizing to Yoko Ono and admitting that he deserved the death penalty. See all his statements here.

Nearly 40 years after the murder of John Lennon, Mark David Chapman, who committed the crime, was denied parole for the 11th time. During the appearance in August, Chapman also admitted to why he took the life of the legendary musician. 

In addition, the murderer, who is now 65 years old, said that he deserved the death penalty after taking the life of the former Beatle, while regretting what he did on December 8, 1980.

John Lennon's murderer confesses and apologizes

Chapman revealed that, as a 25-year-old, he took John Lennon's life in a selfish act to obtain glory, as Lennon was someone extremely famous. 

"I have no excuse. This was for self-glory. I think it's the worst crime that there could be to do something to someone that's innocent," Chapman said in a newly-released parole hearing transcript. 

"(Lennon) was extremely famous. I didn't kill him because of his character or the kind of man he was. He was a family man. He was an icon. He was someone that spoke of things that now we can speak of and it's great. 

"I assassinated him, to use your word earlier, because he was very, very, very famous and that's the only reason and I was very, very, very, very much seeking self-glory, very selfish," he added. 

Mark Chapman, John Lennon's killer and journalist Barbara Walters. 

Mark David Chapman regrets the pain brought upon Yoko Ono

At the same time, Chapman stressed that he regrets what he did almost four decades ago, especially for the pain it caused Lennon's partner, Yoko Ono. 

"I just want to reiterate that I am sorry for my crime (…) I'm sorry for the pain that I caused to her (Ono). I think about it all of the time," Chapman said. 

In addition, Chapman admitted that the act he carried out deserved a death penalty sentence, a measure abolished in New York as of 2007. 

"When you knowingly plot someone's murder and know it's wrong and you do it for yourself, that's a death penalty right there in my opinion," he concluded.

Tribute to John Lennon in Central Park, New York. 

In August, Chapman was denied parole for the 11th time. He's serving 20 years to life for the second-degree murder of Lennon in 1980, and will be up for parole again in August 2022. Oct. 9, 2020 will mark what would've been Lennon's 80th birthday.