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Prince Harry Pens Emotional Letter Amid Coronavirus Crisis Sharing His Fears For Son Archie's Future

Prince Harry Shares His Fears For Son Archie's Future In Moving Letter Amid Coronavirus Crisis
June 11, 2020 - 18:05 / Hayley Paskevich

In a special letter he wrote for African Parks, Prince Harry talks about why conservation has become even more important to him now that he's a dad! Find out what he said!

Prince Harry feels a personal responsibility when it comes to helping to ensure a brighter future for his son Archie! As People shares, Harry— who is president of African Parks— reflected on fatherhood in a foreword for the organization's new annual conservation report. 

And in his touching letter, he talks about the importance of preserving the environment for future generations!

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Prince Harry helps local schoolchildren to plant trees at the Chobe Tree Reserve in Chobe district, in the Northern Botswana on September 26, 2019.

Harry opens up about his hopes for children's future in new letter

Harry began the letter by sharing why having a son has made environmental conservation even more important to him. "Since becoming a father, I feel the pressure is even greater to ensure we can give our children the future they deserve, a future that hasn't been taken from them, and a future full of possibility and opportunity," he said.

"I want us all to be able to tell our children that yes, we saw this coming, and with the determination and help from an extraordinary group of committed individuals, we did what was needed to restore these essential ecosystems."

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Harry says that coronavirus pandemic "has shaken us to our core"

Harry also spoke about the reality of the world's current situation in his letter. As People says, he mentioned that while we are "living through an extinction crisis," the coronavirus is a "global pandemic that has shaken us to our core and brought the world to a standstill." 

Despite the dire circumstances however, Harry doesn't believe that all hope is lost! "There are solutions that are actionable and that work, and the African Parks model is one of them," he explained. 

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Harry frequently visits Africa to assist with conservation work

Harry has visited Africa many times throughout his life, having made quite a few special memories there! People mentions that in 1997, Harry accompanied his father to visit a Zulu village in South Africa, and even met the Spice Girls before their concert in Johannesburg!

Having paid several visits to the continent for both private and public trips, Harry has also helped with lots of conservation work in Africa. Rhinos and elephants are two species he's been a big proponent of, and he's familiarized himself with the African people!

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Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex, Meghan, Duchess of Sussex and their baby son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor during their royal tour of South Africa on September 25, 2019.

Harry has special connection to Africa, calls it his "second home"

Harry even refers to Africa as his "second home," for it's become a place that's close to his heart. He and Meghan Markle also brought their son Archie to Africa in the fall for the first time during their royal tour, as the family met with Archbishop Desmond Tutu and his daughter, Thandeka Tutu-Gxashe!

Apart from being president of African Parks as well as patron of the Rhino Conservation Botswana, Prince Harry co-founded Sentebale in 2006 with Prince Seeiso of Lesotho. Sentebale is a charity organization in support of young people who are affected by HIV and AIDS in Lesotho, Botswana and Malawi.