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Queen to be evacuated if Brexit results in extreme rioting

Queen Elizabeth 
February 12, 2019 - 15:45 / Administrator User

With Brexit looming ever closer on the horizon and the risk of Britain leaving the European Union without a deal, senior government officials have hatched a plan to evacuate the Queen from the country in the case of post-Brexit rioting.  

An emergency scheme first created during the Cold War has been dusted off and brought out of the archives for possible use in the coming weeks. A no-deal Brexit has become a distinct possibility and if politicians really cannot agree on a deal, the risk of rioting will be high throughout the United Kingdom. Just how bad the actual economic fallout is not yet clear, but according to most independent evaluations, it's not looking pretty.

Post-Brexit Rioting: An Evacuation Strategy for Senior Members of the Royal Family 

In light of these dark times ahead, Whitehall officials have decided to recycle a plan first hatched during the Cold War detailing an evacuation strategy for senior members of the Royal Family. According to the Sunday Times, the operation is code-named Operation Candid and dates back to the time of the Cuban Misssile Crisis. The original Cold War Plan involved Her Majesty being removed from the country on the Royal Yacht Britannia in the event of a Soviet nuclear attack. The plan was updated in 1997, important Royals would be sent to the Scottish Hebrides, probably the most remote area in Great Britain. Just where the Queen would head in the case of extreme post-Brexit rioting remains a secret. Das Davies, former head of royal protection at Scotland Yard told the Sunday Times, “Where and how they will evacuate them is top secret and I can’t discuss it. This is a measure that is extremely unlikely to come to pass. [But] the powers-that-be need to have contingency plans for any eventuality".

The Queen is known for never interfering in politics; the modern monarchy is one that lives on thanks to the importance of ceremony and tradition, and a fair share of charitable work, but politics has never been its precedent. And yet, many believe that the Queen's speech at the Sandringham Women's Institute last month, in which she stressed the importance of respecting "different points of view" and coming "together to seek out the common ground", can clearly be linked to the United Kingdom's current political crisis in the run up to Brexit. This politicisation of Britain's monarch increased fears that Queen may find herself becoming a bigger player in the Brexit crisis than many have anticipated up to now.